Holiday Light Safety

With these simple tips, you’ll be able to “disaster-proof” your holiday decorating project, hang holiday lights like a pro, and enjoy a colorful display of joy this season.

With these simple tips, you can stay safe and keep your roof safe.

  1. PLAN YOUR OVERALL DESIGN AND GET ORGANIZED
    Consider your home’s exterior as a room that requires careful attention when it comes to d├ęcor. If you put lights on your roof, make sure you have lights on your door, front porch, pillars, and yard to create a sense of overall cohesion and symmetry. Remember to include your backyard! The twinkles from the lights out your back windows will undoubtedly delight you, and you’ll further enhance the holiday atmosphere indoors.

Examine your roofline, gutters, and shingles, as well as any other hanging surfaces. Examine the thickness of your gutter lip and whether your gutters visually obstruct your roof shingles. If your shingles are loose or damaged, have them repaired by a roofing professional, and hang your holiday lights from a different surface.

Plan how many lights you’ll need (pros always measure), test the lights you already have (throw out the old, dangerous ones), and then purchase additional supplies to fill any gaps. Make certain that all of your lights are suitable for outdoor use.

Recognize that LED holiday lights are more energy efficient and brighter than traditional lights. They also keep things cooler and won’t overheat, lowering the risk of a roof fire. Icicle lights, as well as C7 and C9 bulbs, are popular for hanging on your roof or gutter.

  1. USE PLASTIC CLIPS IN PLACE OF NAILS AND STAPLE GUN.
    Use staple guns or nails that don’t leave tiny holes in the roof (that later could become entry points for water, bringing damage to your roof, attic, and home interior). Plastic clips are your new best buddy when it comes to installing holiday lights on your roof. They readily attach to gutters, roof eaves, or the edge of your roof shingles (not our favorite option, but if required). They can also be used on sidewalks, windows, railings, and other surfaces to give your design a professional appearance. To preserve the exterior of your home, take the time to read and follow the directions.

All-in-one shingle and gutter clips are popular, although eave and ridge clips are also available. Parrot Clips are also ideal for stucco homes. They can fit on walls up to 8 inches wide thanks to their unique bendable nature. They are designed to hold Christmas lights without causing damage to your home.

  1. INSTALL OUTDOOR LIGHTS INTO CIRCUITS WITH GROUND FAULT CIRCUIT INTERRUPTERS TO PROTECT THEM (GFCIS)
    Consider utilizing a power stake instead of stringing cords all over your yard. This small device provides instant electricity whenever and wherever you need it. Also, never connect multiple types of lights to the same circuit or outlet for safety reasons. If you prefer to utilize your home’s exterior outlets, calculate how many feet of power wire you’ll need to go from the power source to the start of your roofline, and get a chord that’s long enough.

Set Christmas light timers to turn on and off when you choose, so that even if you’re not home in the evening, you can still spread holiday cheer to others who pass by.

  1. STAY OFF YOUR ROOFING WHILE HANGING LIGHTS IF AT ALL POSSIBLE.
    Keep your feet on the ground where it’s safer and use an extension pole instead of a ladder to hang as many lights as possible to safeguard your roof.

If you need to use a ladder to reach higher areas on the perimeter of your roof, do it with a partner for safety. If you’re mounting a ladder, have someone else hold it steady for you. Hang a bucket on the ladder with a S hook to hold the supplies you’ll need. So you can concentrate on safety and light placement, ask your partner to pass you any additional goods you require.

  1. WALK ON YOUR ROOF WITH EXTREME CAUTION.
    Stay off your roof as much as possible to extend its longevity. If you must walk on it to hang holiday lights, do so slowly and in soft tennis shoes. If your roof is built of tiles, place your feet carefully on two peaks rather than between the valley tiles to avoid damaging any of them.